Working for birds in Africa

Introduction

Mon, 01/21/2013 - 13:48 -- abc_admin
Mauritius_Kestrel

Mauritius Kestrel Falco punctatus male, Vallee de l'Est, Mauritius

Image Credit: 
Jacques de Speville
Mauritius_Parakeet

Mauritius Parakeet Psittacula echo male, Macchabee Forest, Mauritius

Image Credit: 
Jacques de Speville

The Republic of Mauritius was once home to perhaps the world's best known bird species, the Dodo Raphus cucullatus, and is now home to some of the world's rarest species, the Mauritius Kestrel Falco punctatus (at one stage the world's rarest bird) and the Mauritius Parakeet Psittacula echo, another critically endangered species. It is no surprise that for a remote Indian Ocean island, Mauritius has relatively few bird species, however the island does boast one of the densest concentrations of endangered bird species in the world. Although the Dodo can now only be seen as a tourist motif, such charismatic and gravely endangered birds as Herald (Round Island) Petrel Pterodroma arminjoniana, Pink Pigeon Nesoenas mayeri and Mauritius Parakeet P. echo may still attract the energetic endemic-hunter. Birders visiting the island for a beach holiday will find a few hours birding in the Black River Gorges National Park a pleasant change from snorkelling and a useful antidote to sunburn.

This country account for Mauritius & Rodrigues serves to provide birders with up to date information about birds and birding in the area. While the information provided has been sourced from a variety of reliable resources (a list is provided at the end of this document) the aim is such that this document is dynamic in that birders who have recently visited the region can add their own accounts and contributions. We therefore encourage readers to email new information to info@africanbirdclub.org . Please note that the names of birds used in this document are those adopted by the African Bird Club checklist, which can be found at African Bird Club checklist.

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