Working for birds in Africa

Conservation

Fri, 01/25/2013 - 15:14 -- abc_admin
Somalia_Fishing

Sacaada Diin Islands overfishing

Somalia

Image Credit: 
Abdi Jama
Somalia_Sea_Cucumbers

Sacaada Diin Islands harvesting sea cucumbers

Somalia

Image Credit: 
Abdi Jama
Somalia_Guano

Maydh Island fishermen preparing to scrape up guano

Somalia

Image Credit: 
Abdi Jama
Somalia_Overgrazing

Sheepherders overgrazing Boorame Plains

Somalia

Image Credit: 
Abdi Jama

"Somalia has suffered from many years of civil unrest so it is not perhaps surprising that according to a late May 2002 news item, a new report prepared by an environmental group known as Natural Resource Management and Environmental Protection, warns that Somalia will be a country without trees within the next few years if trees continue to be cut down at the present rate. It is understood that deforestation has been most severe in Middle Jubba, Lower Jubba, Middle Shabeelle and Lower Shabeelle - according to the news item, substantial shipments of charcoal are passing through Kismaayo and Mogadishu on a daily basis.

The Important Bird Areas which may be seriously affected are: 8, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24 - see IBA section. It is further understood the report claims that Somalia's wildlife is now almost non-existent following widespread poaching." In addition, the dumping of toxic wastes off the central eastern coast presents a serious environmental hazard.

Even in Somaliland, most of the IBAs are overexploited and degraded as follows:

So001, Sacaada Diin Islands are severely overfished by foreign fleets.

Large groups of young divers over-harvest sea cucumbers and an endangered turtle.

So 002, Maydh Island is exploited for its guano deposits by fishermen.

So003 & So006, Daallo & Gacan Libaax IBAs are suffering from overgrazing and tree-chopping for livestock. The juniper forests in both IBAs are degrading gradually going the way of Djibouti's Foret Du Day.

So007, Boorame Plains IBA, the home of the endangered Archer's Lark Heteromirafra archeri is degraded from homesteading communities who migrate back and forth between these plains and Oogo high country as well as the coastal zone to the north.

WIWO has conducted 18 surveys in Africa. The WIWO Forward Plan includes censuses of waders along the coast of Somalia. Contact address: Working Group on International Wader and Waterfowl Research (WIWO), c/o Driebergse weg 16c, 3708 JB Zeist, Netherlands.

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