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Wed, 02/06/2013 - 15:19 -- abc_admin

These are largely unconfirmed records published in recent Bulletins of the African Bird Club for information only.

from ABC Bulletin 23.1

Records from the period July– December 2015 include the following. A Fulvous Whistling Duck Dendrocygna bicolor and two White-backed Ducks Thalassornis leuconotus were at Gammams Water Treatment Works, Windhoek, on 9 August; both species are unusual in the centre of the country. A juvenile Little Bittern Ixobrychus minutus was found in a garden in Luderitz on 29 November, well outside its known range. A Spotted Crake Porzana porzana was observed at Rundu Sewage Works on 27 November. A satellite-tagged female European Honey Buzzard Pernis apivorus that spent the austral summer in Free State, South Africa, was in the Caprivi Strip on 2 November. Single European Honey Buzzards were also noted at Monte Christo farm, c.30 km north of Windhoek, on 21 November; in Klein Windhoek on 27 November; at Teufelsbach farm, c.45 km north of Windhoek, on 29 November; over the Protea Hotel, Katima Mulilo, on 6 December; and at Avis Dam, Windhoek, on 8 December. A juvenile Black Sparrowhawk Accipiter melanoleucus flew over Halali, Etosha National Park (=NP) on 5 August, well outside its known range. A Red-necked Buzzard Buteo auguralis was reported from Ngepi Camp, in the Caprivi Strip, on 23 September; if confirmed, this would be the seventh record for southern Africa.

Eurasian Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus were observed at Sandwich Harbour on 18 July (at least two) and at Walvis Bay Lagoon on 1 September (one), 23 October (one) and 14 November (at least two). A Pacific Golden Plover Pluvialis fulva in full breeding plumage was present at Lover’s Hill, Walvis Bay, on 18 July. A Caspian Plover Charadrius asiaticus and two Slaty Egrets Egretta vinaceigula were located at Onesi Dam, c.35 km east of Ruacana, on 26 September. Single Pectoral Sandpipers Calidris melanotos were at Rietfontein, Etosha NP, on 2 October and along the Kavango River near Shamvura on 18 October. A Eurasian Curlew Numenius arquata was c.15 km north of King Nehele Gate of Etosha NP from 28 October until at least 13 November. On 17 September, a Whimbrel N. phaeopus was at Rietfontein and a Ruddy Turnstone Arenaria interpres at Homob in Etosha NP. At least five Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus were still present in Walvis Bay on 5 December.

A Grey-headed Gull Chroicocephalus cirrocephalus was at Avis Dam, Windhoek, on 12 July; this is a very unusual species in central Namibia. At Walvis Bay, a Black-headed Gull C. ridibundus was reported on 23 September and a Franklin’s Gull Leucophaeus pipixcan on 14 November. A Lesser Black-backed Gull Larus fuscus was at Mahango Safari Lodge, in the Kavango region, on 14 October. At Mile 4 Salt Works, just north of Swakopmund, a tern resembling an Elegant Tern Thalasseus elegans was observed on 1 November; this is just the third record for Namibia and the seventh for southern Africa (the first was at Strandfontein Sewage Works, South Africa, in January 2006)—the identity of these terns has still not been unequivocally established.

An out-of-range male Pennant-winged Nightjar Caprimulgus vexillarius was seen at Hobatere Lodge on 20 October. An African Grey Hornbill Tockus nasutus was at Greenfire Desert Lodge, c.130 km south of Sesriem, on 6–8 September. A Tree Pipit Anthus trivialis stayed in Okaukeujo, Etosha NP, from 16 November until at least 20th. On 2 August, a Karoo Thrush Turdus smithi was encountered at Sossusvlei, quite far north for this species. An African Reed Warbler Acrocephalus (scirpaceus) baeticatus was present in a garden in Luderitz on 17–18 October, somewhat out of range. Single Collared Flycatchers Ficedula albicollis were observed just south of Anderson Gate, Etosha NP, on 13 October, and at Rustig Toko Lodge, between Kamanjab and Etosha NP, on 26 October; this species is rarely reported in the country. A House Crow Corvus splendens was still present at the Pelican Bay Protea Hotel, Walvis Bay, in late November.

from ABC Bulletin 22.2

Perhaps the most noteworthy find for the period January - June 2015 was that of southern Africa’s sixth Red-throated Pipit Anthus cervinus, discovered at Avis Dam, near Windhoek, on 7 January, which remained until 16 February; previous records from the subregion were in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa (two), Zimbabwe (two) and Namibia (one), with the last record being in January 1999.

An African Pygmy Goose Nettapus auritus located near Okaukuejo, in Etosha National Park (=NP), on 8 June, is a rather westerly record. A Great White Pelican Pelecanus onocrotalus, ringed on 30 December 1972, was seen in Walvis Bay on 3 January, just over 42 years later. In Windhoek, a Hadada Ibis Bostrychia hagedash - a very unusual species for central Namibia - was in Pioneer Park on 24 January. A Slaty Egret Egretta vinaceigula was at Monte Christo farm, c.30 km north of Windhoek, on 25 January. Up to four European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus were reported from the Windhoek area in January–mid February. An Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus was observed in Namib Naukluft NP on 18 January, with a possible adult between Mariental and Keetmanshoop on 23 June; the latter would be a very southerly record for the country. Single Amur Falcons Falco amurensis were found amongst Red-footed Falcons F. vespertinus c.140 km north-east of Windhoek on 11 January and at Avis Dam, near Windhoek, on 24 January.

A Wattled Crane Grus carunculatus was reported from the Andoni Plains, in Etosha NP, on 10 March. An out-of-range African Jacana Actophilornis africana was seen in Ameib Rhino Sanctuary, near Usakos, in early June. Up to three Eurasian Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus stayed at Walvis Bay from late December until at least 8 February. A count of 1,300 Caspian Plovers Charadrius asiaticus at Omathiya Lakes, north of Etosha, on 18 January was one of the largest concentrations of this species recorded in the subregion. A Pacific Golden Plover Pluvialis fulva, first seen at Walvis Bay in mid November, was still present on 21 April. Other waders at Walvis Bay included a Pectoral Sandpiper Calidris melanotos on 18 March - 5 April, a Common Redshank Tringa totanus on 8 February, and many Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus during the period, with >60 on 8 February, >30 on 11 March and a single on 2 June. Single Red Phalaropes P. fulicarius were reported on a dam c.50 km north of Maltahöhe on 5 March and c.20 km offshore from Walvis Bay on 7 March.

A Woodland Kingfisher Halcyon senegalensis was at Monte Christo farm, c.30 km north of Windhoek, on 25 January, returning to this site for its sixth consecutive season; another was at Omaruru on 29 January, yet another individual south of its normal distribution in the country. A Broad-billed Roller Eurystomus glaucurus west of Etosha NP, near Galton Gate, on 30 April, was unusually far west for this species. Also outside their normal range were an African Pipit Anthus cinnamomeus along the beach at Guano Bay, in Lüderitz, on 23 May, a female African Paradise Flycatcher Terpsiphone viridis at the edge of Walvis Bay on 5 April, and a Eurasian Golden Oriole Oriolus oriolus in a garden in Lüderitz on 28 - 29 January. A pair of Angolan Swees Coccopygia melanotis bocagei was found c.13 km east of Kunene River Lodge on 29 April; this is probably the sixth record in the subregion, with at least five between Ruacana and Epupa Falls. 

from ABC Bulletin 22.1

The most remarkable find during the period July–December 2014 was that of a juvenile Red-necked Buzzard Buteo auguralis, photographed at Buffalo Reserve, in the Caprivi Strip, on 28 July; although it was the first to be identified in the subregion, other records have subsequently come to light, including two from Namibia, at Ngepi Camp, western Caprivi, on 8 March 2009, and Mahango Game Reserve on 11 August 2012 (two additional records are from Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, South Africa, in August 2001, and Chobe National Park, Botswana, on 11 July 2014). A small and principally sedentary population occurs in southern Angola. This is the third species to be added to the southern African list (now comprising 968 species) in 2014, following the January records of Trindade (=Herald) Petrel Pterodroma arminjoniana off Eastern Cape, South Africa, and Red-tailed Shrike Lanius phoenicuroides in Mozambique.

Other noteworthy records include a few South African Shelducks Tadorna cana, White-backed Ducks Thalassornis leuconotus and Black-necked Grebes Podiceps nigricollis c.20 km north of Gobabis, in the north, on 1 October—all slightly out of range according to the most recent distribution maps. Another White-backed Duck was at Gammams Water Treatment Works, Windhoek, on 12 October and 14 December—a very unusual species for the centre of the country. A Slaty Egret Egretta vinaceigula at Onesi Dam, near Ruacana, on 21 August, was well west of its normal range. A Woolly-necked Stork Ciconia episcopus was observed at Erindi Private Nature Reserve, north-east of Okahandja, in early December. European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus were reported from Mahango Game Reserve on 2 November and 13 December, and from Etosha National Park and Waterberg Plateau Park in early December. A Western Marsh Harrier Circus aeruginosus flew over the rice paddies near Katima Mulilo Lodge, eastern Caprivi, on 9 December. A Bateleur Terathopius ecaudatus and a Black Sparrowhawk Accipiter melanoleucus just outside Swakopmund in mid September were of local interest.

A Lesser Jacana Microparra capensis was found at Epelele Dam, 50 km east of Ruacana, on 11 December. Two Eurasian Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus were observed at Walvis Bay on 26 December, with a Pacific Golden Plover Pluvialis fulva also there on 15 November and 14 December. A Black-winged Pratincole Glareola nordmanni and a group of Caspian Plovers Charadrius asiaticus were found at a farm 50 km west of Windhoek on 27 December. Other waders of interest included a Terek Sandpiper Xenus cinereus at the Andoni Plains waterhole, Etosha National Park, on 20 August; a Eurasian Curlew Numenius arquata at Onesi Dam, Ovamboland, on 3 October; four Ruddy Turnstones Arenaria interpres at Okondjatu, c.160 km west of Otjiwarongo, in the north, on 1 October; and up to 25 Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus at Walvis Bay Salt Works from late September until the end of the year.

A White-browed Coucal Centropus superciliosus was reported from Omaruru, well south of its normal range, on 28 September. Also outside their usual range were a Giant Kingfisher Megaceryle maxima at Windhoek’s Gammams Water Treatment Works on 14 December, and a Karoo Thrush Turdus smithi at Rossmund Golf Estate, Swakopmund, on 6 August. A House Crow Corvus splendens, first reported in May, was still at the Walvis Bay waterfront in late November. A report from 29 September of a ‘Swee Waxbill’ Coccopygia sp. observed at Ruacana Falls, in the north, almost certainly referred to the form bocagei, endemic to West Angola and sometimes treated as a separate species (Angolan Waxbill or Angola Swee); this taxon has been claimed from northern Namibia before but conclusive evidence of its occurrence has yet to be provided. 

from ABC Bulletin 21.2

The most remarkable find for the period January - June 2014 was that of a Barau’s Petrel Pterodroma baraui in Namibian waters on 4 February; this is the first record for the country and apparently also the westernmost - full details will be published in a future Bull. ABC.

The influx of European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus in southern Africa was noted in Namibia, with singles near See-eis on 25 January, at Okahandja Country Hotel on 20 February, Daan Viljoen Game Reserve on 23 February, Avis Dam on 13 March, 40 km east of Kalkrand on 16 March, and between Windhoek and Dordabis on 30 March. A juvenile Allen’s Gallinule Porphyrio alleni was located at Monte Christo Guest Farm, north of Windhoek, in mid February. On 28 February, a Denham’s Bustard Ardeotis denhami was observed in Etosha National Park (=NP) - a very westerly locality for the species. A Eurasian Oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus was in the Walvis Bay area on 22 January, with a second also there at the end of the month and a third in late February; one was still present in early April. A Pacific Golden Plover Pluvialis fulva, first reported at Walvis Bay Lagoon on 30 October 2013, was still present on 27 April whilst, at Walvis Bay Salt Works, an American Golden Plover P. dominica was also present in January - April, with a second there in late January. At least two Black-tailed Godwits Limosa limosa were at Fisher’s Pan, Etosha NP, on 30 April. Single Common Redshanks Tringa totanus were recorded at Mile 4 Salt Works, Swakopmund, in late January, Luderitz on 8 February, Walvis Bay in mid March, and Fisher’s Pan, Etosha NP, on 20 March. Good numbers of Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus were present at Walvis Bay in January - March, with at least 70 at the end of January; at least three were at Mile 4 Salt Works, Swakopmund, in late January. A single Red Phalarope P. fulicarius was at Mile 4 Salt Works on 23 February. A Eurasian Curlew Numenius arquata and two Gull-billed Terns Gelochelidon nilotica were observed at Okashana Spring, on the Adoni Plains north of Etosha Pan, on 12 March.

A rather out-of-range Lesser Striped Swallow Cecropis abyssinica was reported from a farm south-east of See-eis on 25 January. A Southern Black Flycatcher Melaenornis pammelaina at the campsite of Okahandja Country Hotel on 19 January, was also slightly out of range. A House Crow Corvus splendens located near the Waterfront at Walvis Bay on 3 June, appeared to have been in the area since at least 9 May; this may be the second record for Namibia, following another from Walvis Bay in 2011, when a single bird remained around Lover’s Hill for several months. 

from ABC Bulletin 21.1

Southern Africa’s first Ortolan Bunting Emberiza hortulana was photographed at NamibRand Nature Reserve, central Namibia, on 13 November 2013. 

Other records from the period July - December 2013 include the following. A Wandering Albatross Diomedea exulans, first seen from a fishing vessel just south of the Orange River, Northern Cape, South Africa, on 22 October, remained with the ship all day, eventually passing into Namibian waters. At least six Leach’s Storm-petrels Oceanodroma leucorhoa were reported c.50 nautical miles off Luderitz on 13 November. In late July, a Black Heron Egretta ardesiaca and a Glossy Ibis Plegadis falcinellus were at the Walvis Bay Sewage Works. Single European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus were reported from Otjiseva farm, c.30 km north of Windhoek, on 27 October; c.40 km west of Windhoek on 29 November; and from Ngepi Camp, in the western Caprivi, on 13 December.

An American Golden Plover Pluvialis dominica was located at Walvis Bay Salt Works on 29 July (possibly one of the individuals reported from this area earlier in the year), whilst a Pacific Golden Plover P. fulva stayed at Walvis Bay Lagoon from 30 October until at least 8 December. A Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa was found at Rundu Sewage Works on 16 December and a Green Sandpiper Tringa ochropus near Katima Mulilo, in the eastern Caprivi, at the end of August. A Common Redshank T. totanus was in the Walvis Bay area in late July, with at least one other individual at Mile 4 Salt Works, north of Swakopmund, in mid December. At Walvis Bay Salt Works, at least two Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus were present in late July; their numbers increased to 35 at the end of October and to at least 50 in late November, with large numbers still there in December. A Wilson’s Phalarope Steganopus tricolor was also seen in the area on 15 - 17 October, and a Red Phalarope Phalaropus fulicarius on 8 December. A Franklin’s Gull Leucophaeus pipixcan was observed in Swakopmund in mid August. Gull-billed Terns Gelochelidon nilotica were reported from Island View Lodge, Katima Mulilo, on 30 July, and the Andoni Plains, Etosha National Park, on 16 October (still present on 14 December).

A Woodland Kingfisher Halcyon senegalensis was, once again, present at Monte Christo farm, c.30 km north of Windhoek, on 24 November - this is the fifth successive season that this bird has returned to this site, well south of its normal range. Also well outside of its known range in the subregion was a Tree Pipit Anthus trivialis in a garden in Luderitz on 26 November. A Whinchat Saxicola rubetra was photographed at Palmwag Lodge, in northern Namibia, on 5 December; this appears to be southern Africa’s 18th record. A Grey Penduline Tit Anthoscopus caroli was observed c.2 km west of Ruacana on 17 October, apparently c.300 km west of where it normally occurs.  

from ABC Bulletin 20.2

In January - June 2013 the following were reported. As usual, Mile 4 Salt Works near Swakopmund produced many noteworthy records, including up to two Common Redshanks Tringa tetanus and a Buff-breasted Sandpiper Calidris subruficollis in January - early March, a Franklin's Gull Leucophaeus pipixcan on 12 January, and an Elegant Tern Thalasseus elegans on 22 January - 3 March, with a second also there on 17 February. At Walvis Bay, a Eurasian Oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus was still present on 10 February. Other noteworthy waders at this site included an American Golden Plover Pluvialis dominica in February - April, with a second there on 15-31 March, a Pacific Golden Plover P. fulva on 3 March - 1 May, a Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa, a Wilson's Phalarope Phalaropus tricolor on 15-31 March, >50 Red-necked Phalaropes P. lobatus in February - April and several Red Phalaropes P. fulicarius in March.

A Spectacled Petrel Procellaria conspicillata was reported c. 180 nautical miles west of Walvis Bay in early May. A far out-of-range Rufous-bellied Heron Ardeola rufiventris was reported from Monte Christo, c.30 km north-west of Windhoek, on 3 February. A Lesser Black-backed Gull Larus fuscus was at Lake Liambezi in early January. A Gull-billed Tern Gelochelidon nilotica was seen on the Andoni Plains, north of Etosha, on 13 March, whilst two Caspian Terns Hydroprogne caspia were at Hardap Dam, between Keetmanshoop and Windhoek, in June. A Black-eared Sparrow Lark Eremopterix australis was observed c.60 km south-east of Walvis Bay on 26 April, well north of its usual range. Village Indigobirds Vidua chalybeata of the white-billed okavangoensis race were reported from the Windhoek area in late March - early April.

from ABC Bulletin 20.1

Records from May - December 2012 include the following. The most exciting and unexpected news from the period involved the Black Skimmer Rynchops niger, which was first observed at Rietvlei, South Africa, appearing at Walvis Bay, c.1,250 km to the north, on 7 October and remaining there until 9th. The second most remarkable find was that of a small population of Angola Cave Chats Xenocopsychus ansorgei, discovered on the southern slopes of the Zebra Mountains, in the north, in May; at least three pairs were seen, but further exploration of the area may well reveal larger numbers. This discovery constitutes a considerable southward range extension of a species that was previously considered to be an Angolan endemic.

Other reports of interest include a Wandering Albatross Diomedea exulans and a Spectacled Petrel Procellaria (aequinoctialis) conspicillata photographed during a pelagic trip out of Walvis Bay in early July, with at least four Wandering Albatrosses c.60 nautical miles north-west of Walvis Bay in late July; a Great White Pelican Pelecanus onocrotalus at Erindi Private Game Reserve, near Omaruru, in late November; a Glossy Ibis Plegadis falcinellus at Walvis Bay sewage works on 22 July; a Long-crested Eagle Lophaetus occipitalis at Hoochland Park, Windhoek, in late November; an immature Red-footed Falcon Falco vespertinus photographed just outside Luderitz on 29 November; up to three Baillon’s Crakes Porzana pusilla at Mariental on 14 - 15 October; and an African Crake Crex egregia at Namutoni, Etosha National Park (=NP) on 5 December.

An American Golden Plover Pluvialis dominica was at Walvis Bay from late September until at least 18 November, with another at Mile 4 Salt Works, north of Swakopmund, on 18 November. In Etosha NP, two Pectoral Sandpipers Calidris melanotos were reported from Rietfontein on 26 December and a Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa from Fisher’s Pan also in late December. The partially leucistic Common Redshank Tringa totanus, first located at Mile 4 Salt Works, Swakopmund, on 13 October 2011, was still present on 4 November. On 11 September, a Wilson’s Phalarope Phalaropus tricolor was at Walvis Bay on the same pan as the (same?) individual at the end of 2011; it was still present in late November. Variable numbers of Red-necked Phalaropes P. lobatus were present at Walvis Bay from July until the end of the year, with 6 - 9 in July - September, at least 40 in late October, and up to 60 in November. A Red Phalarope P. fulicarius was also there from 22 September until at least late November. A Gull-billed Tern Gelochelidon nilotica stayed in Etosha NP in early December, with another at Walvis Bay in mid December.

At least four Woodland Kingfishers Halcyon senegalensis returned for the fourth successive season to Monte Christo, c.30 km north-east of Windhoek, in November; this is well south of their normal range. A pair of Souza’s Shrikes Lanius souzae was feeding a juvenile in the Caprivi Strip in late November.

 

from ABC Bulletin 19.2

Records from late December 2011 - June 2012 include the following. A Black Heron Egretta ardesiaca was at Otjivero Dam, c.90 km east of Windhoek, on 29 January (there are only a few records from central Namibia), whilst a Slaty Egret E. vinaceigula was reported from Etosha National Park (=NP) on 27 February. A Woolly-necked Stork Ciconia episcopus was discovered in Swakopmund, well outside its normal range, on 6 June. A Glossy Ibis Plegadis falcinellus was present at Walvis Bay Sewage Works on 21 - 22 January.

In early January, single European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus were reported 100 km north of Gobabis and from Avis Dam in Windhoek, with one also near Katima Mulilo on 16 March. An immature Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus was observed at Ombika waterhole, Etosha NP, on 1 January. Also in Etosha, an African Crake Crex egregia was found at Nuamses Pan on 9 June. A juvenile Allen’s Gallinule Porphyrio alleni was at Windhoek West on 26 February; this is a noteworthy record for the centre of the country.

At least three Eurasian Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus were at Sandwich Harbour on 20 - 23 January. A Pectoral Sandpiper Calidris melanotos was near Namutoni, Etosha NP, on 24 April. Namibia’s third Buff-breasted Sandpiper Tryngites subruficollis, discovered at Mile 4 Salt Works, Swakopmund, on 13 April remained there until the end of the month; the first was seen at Swakopmund in February 1984 and the second at Walvis Bay in November 1984. A single Common Redshank Tringa totanus was at Walvis Bay in late January, whilst at least three were at Mile 4 Salt Works on 22 April. A Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa was reported from Etosha NP. The 18th Wilson’s Phalarope Phalaropus tricolor for the subregion stayed at Walvis Bay from late December until at least mid January. At the same site, no fewer than 50 Red-necked Phalaropes P. lobatus were counted on 12 January, with at least six still there on 22 April. A Red Phalarope P. fulicarius was also there on 31 December. Still in the Walvis Bay area, two Common Black-headed Gulls Larus ridibundus were present in late February, with one remaining until at least late March, and up to two Gull-billed Terns Gelochelidon nilotica from late December until at least 31 May. Also of interest was a Lesser Crested Tern Thalasseus bengalensis discovered on Halifax Island, just off Luderitz, on 3 May; there are only a handful of records for the country and this constitutes the first for southern Namibia. A Pied Kingfisher Ceryle rudis at Walvis Bay in late January was an unusual record for this part of the southern African subregion.

An African Pitta Pitta angolensis seen on Hauchabfontein farm, on the south side of the Naukluft Mountains, on 19 - 20 December may represent the first record for the country and the westernmost in the subregion. A Yellow Wagtail Motacilla flava was present at the Namib Rand Nature Reserve in late January. There were several reports of Village Indigobirds Vidua chalybeata from the Windhoek area in late February.

from ABC Bulletin 19.1

A belated report from May 2011 mentions that, due to abundant rainfall, several Dusky Larks Pinarocorys nigricans were present in the north of the country (including in Etosha National Park), as well as hundreds of singing Monotonous Larks Mirafra passerina.

Records from July - December 2011 include the following. A Pink-backed Pelican Pelecanus rufescens was at Gammams Sewage Works, Windhoek, in mid October. In central Namibia, a Slaty Egret Egretta vinaceigula was discovered at Otjivero Dam, c.90 km east of Windhoek, on 31 July; this is perhaps only the second record for this part of the country. A Fulvous Whistling Duck Dendrocygna bicolor was reported c.20 km south of Sesriem on 1 August; there are only a handful of records from central Namibia. In Olympia, a suburb of Windhoek, single European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus were observed on 30 November and 3 December. A Pallid Harrier Circus macrourus was seen flying over irrigation plots below Hardap Dam around 25 December.

Eurasian Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus were located at Sandwich Harbour on 16 - 17 July (two) and Walvis Bay on 22 December (one); there was also a Lesser Sand Plover Charadrius mongolus at the latter site. Two to five Common Redshanks Tringa totanus were present at Mile 4 Salt Works, Swakopmund, from late August until the end of the year; a partially leucistic individual was there from mid October. A Lesser Yellowlegs T. flavipes was found at Rundu Sewage Works, in the north, on 21 August; this appears to be the first for Namibia and only the seventh record for southern Africa. At least three Green Sandpipers T. ochropus were in the vicinity of Namutoni, Etosha National Park (=NP), on 9 November. At Walvis Bay Salt Works, Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus were present from August until the end of the year, with numbers increasing from five to 13 (in late September), 24 (in early November) and 40 (in mid November), to 60–70 (on 19 December). Elsewhere, two were seen near Namutoni, Etosha NP, on 9 November, and one at Mile 4 Salt Works on 27 November. A Wilson’s Phalarope P. tricolor stayed in Walvis Bay from 16 December until 31 December at least, with a Red Phalarope P. fulicarius also there on 31 December.

Also in Walvis Bay, single Common Black-headed Gulls Larus ridibundus were recorded on 26 September and on 7 and 14 November, and at Mile 4 Salt Works, Swakopmund, on 23 November. A Franklin’s Gull L. pipixcan was observed at Walvis Bay on 14 November and a Sabine’s Gull Xema sabini at Kalkheuwel, Etosha NP, on 20 or 21 November. Gull-billed Terns Sterna nilotica were reported from the vicinity of Namutoni, Etosha NP, on 9 November (two) and 24 December (one), Mile 4 Salt Works, Swakopmund, on 23 November (one), and Walvis Bay on 26 November–31 December (1–2). A Royal Tern S. maxima was claimed at Cape Cross on 19 July; this is a very rare species in southern Africa.

Also of interest were three Woodland Kingfishers Halcyon senegalensis and a single Yellow-billed Oxpecker Buphagus africanus at Monte Christo Guest Farm, c.30 km north of Windhoek, on 27 November; this is at least the third consecutive year that the kingfishers have returned to this location well south of their usual range, but it is the first time that more than two have been reported. A Livingstone’s Flycatcher Erythrocercus livingstonei seen at Ngepi Camp, in the Caprivi, on 6 July was much further west than this species’ usual distribution. Also far out of range (and in very atypical habitat) was an Eastern Black-headed Oriole Oriolus larvatus at Swakopmund on 21 July. A male Village Indigobird Vidua chalybeata was observed in a garden in Klein Windhoek on 9 December; this area was also occupied by the species in 2010.

from ABC Bulletin 18.2

Records from December 2010 - early June 2011 include the following. Two Pink-backed Pelicans Pelecanus rufescens were at Otjivero Dam, near Omitara c.90 km east of Windhoek, on 30 January, with two at Gammams Sewage Works, Windhoek, on 12 June; this species is very unusual in the centre of the country. A Knob-billed Duck Sarkidiornis melanotos landed in a garden in Walvis Bay on 17 February - an unusual coastal record. A lineatus Black Kite Milvus migrans was photographed 20 km south of Otjokavare on 20 March. A Bat Hawk Macheirhamphus alcinus was reported on 21 May c.50 km south-east of Dordabis, well south of its known range. On 31 January, an Allen’s Gallinule Porphyrio alleni was at Gorengab Water Care Plant, Windhoek; this species is rare outside the Caprivi Strip.

Eurasian Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus were reported from Walvis Bay Salt Works in late December - January (two) and Sandwich Harbour on 22 - 23 January (one). In Swakopmund, a Lesser Sand Plover Charadrius mongolus was present at Mile 4 Salt Works in early February and a Greater Sand Plover C. leschenaultii on 8 January. An American Golden Plover Pluvialis dominica was claimed from Luderitz in late December. At least two Common Redshanks Tringa totanus occurred at Mile 4 Salt Works, north of Swakopmund, in January - June. Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus were present at Walvis Bay Salt Works throughout the period, fluctuating from at least two to 13 (in late January), with at least four still there on 3 June. The Common Black-headed Gull Larus ridibundus first seen at Walvis Bay on 22 October, was still present in late January. A Gull-billed Tern Sterna nilotica was in Etosha National Park on 8 December.

A Senegal Coucal Centropus senegalensis was reported between Windhoek and the international airport on 2 April; this is substantially further south than the species’ normal range. The Woodland Kingfishers Halcyon senegalensis reported from Monte Christo Guest Farm, c.30 km north-west of Windhoek, in November were still present in early February. Also there, a pair of Black-backed Puffbacks Dryoscopus cubla was feeding a juvenile in February. A House Crow Corvus splendens near the entrance to Walvis Bay on 3 June was a surprising record and possibly the first for Namibia. In February, a major influx of Village Indigobirds Vidua chalybeata occurred into the Windhoek area.

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Records from July - December 2010 include the following. A subadult Saddle-billed Stork Ephippiorhynchus senegalensis was reported from a farm c.30 km north of Windhoek on 29 August; this is a rare species in central Namibia, with only a few scattered records in the area. A Glossy Ibis Plegadis falcinellus was at Windhoek sewage works on 28 November. A well out-of-range Fulvous Whistling Duck Dendrocygna bicolor was observed at Walvis Bay Sewage Works on 1 August. An Osprey Pandion haliaetus was reported intermittently from Avis Dam, near Windhoek, from late June until November. A European Honey Buzzard Pernis apivorus was seen in Olympia, a suburb of Windhoek, on 9 December.

At Namutoni water hole, Etosha National Park, a Lesser Jacana Microparra capensis was observed on 7 - 8 December. A Eurasian Oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus remained at Walvis Bay Salt Works from 31 October until early December at least, with two there on 1 December. Two Common Redshanks Tringa totanus were still at Mile 4 Salt Works, north of Swakopmund, from early October until mid December at least; two were also seen in the Walvis Bay area in late November. Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus were present at Walvis Bay Salt Works throughout the period, their numbers fluctuating from 6 - 7 (in July–August) to 3 - 40 (in October–December). A Common Black-headed Gull Larus ridibundus in full breeding plumage stayed at Walvis Bay from 22 October until early December at least. A Sabine's Gull Xema sabini was found at Kalkheuwel waterhole near Namutoni, Etosha National Park, on 23 October, over 400 km from the coast; this is remarkably far inland for a species that mainly frequents coastal waters while wintering in southern Africa.

A Jacobin Cuckoo Clamator jacobinus was reported from the camp area at Ai Ais on 17 October, somewhat further south than its known range in the country. Two Woodland Kingfishers Halcyon senegalensis were located at a farm c.30 km north of Windhoek on 28 November; this is the second season that they have returned to this site, which is well south of their normal range in Namibia. A Flappet Lark Mirafra rufocinnamomea was singing between Namutoni and Andoni, Etosha National Park, in early December. An out-of-range Collared Palm Thrush Cichladusa arquata regularly visited a bird bath in a farm garden near Tsumeb from 31 October until mid November at least. In early August, an exhausted juvenile Eurasian Golden Oriole Oriolus oriolus was found along the beach near Conception Bay, south of Walvis Bay; this record is both slightly out of range and unseasonal. A Grey-headed Bushshrike Malaconotus blanchoti of the race citrinipectus was reported from the Kunene River Lodge gardens, in the north-west, in early September; this is a very rare bird in this part of the southern African subregion.

Records from January - June 2010 include the following. An African Openbill Anastomus lamelligerus stayed at Windhoek from 8 March to at least 11 April. Also at Windhoek, an Osprey Pandion haliaetus was at Avis Dam on 9 May. A Bat Hawk Machieramphus alcinus reported from Kakuse Farm, c.70 km northwest of Tsumeb, in early April was notable. A young Palm-nut Vulture Gypohierax angolensis was found dead at Walvis Bay on 22 June. Three Three-banded Coursers Rhinoptilus cinctus, including a chick, were ringed on Kakuse Farm on 15 May; there are very few records from north-central Namibia and, although the species is sporadically reported from the Caprivi, the nearest reasonably sized population probably is in western Zimbabwe. Two Common Redshanks Tringa totanus remained at Mile 4 Salt Works near Swakopmund throughout the period and apparently were going to spend the southern winter there; one was also observed at Walvis Bay on 28 February. Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus were seen in Walvis Bay from February to May, with at least three individuals on 28 February and up to 13 on 9 May. A Red Phalarope P. fulicarius was at Mile 4 Salt Works near Swakopmund on 8 April. A Franklin's Gull Larus pipixcan and a Common Black-headed Gull L. ridibundus were still present at Walvis Bay at the end of February.

Records from July–December 2009 include the folowing. A trip aboard a bottom trawler off the coast of the north of the country (more or less at the latitude of Etosha National Park) in July produced three Wandering Albatrosses Diomedea exulans and at least four Spectacled Petrels Procellaria (aequinoctialis) conspicillata. A Tristan Albatross D. (exulans)dabbenena was seen offshore on 3 August; the bird was ringed and appeared to be from the colony on Gough Island. Another individual was photographed just beyond the 200 nautical mile limit in August. These waters also produced a Sooty Albatross Phoebetria fusca and a Blue Petrel Halobaena caerulea, the latter probably one of the northernmost records of this species. A Madeiran Storm-petrel Oceanodroma castro was photographed on Halifax Island just off Luderitz in mid October.

In early November, a Grey Kestrel Falco ardosiaceus was observed c.50 km west of Katima Mulilo, in the easternmost Caprivi Strip; this species is normally restricted to north-western Namibia. A Eurasian Oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus stayed in Walvis Bay from late September to December at least. Up to three Common Redshanks Tringa totanus were present at Mile 4 Salt Works north of Swakopmund throughout the period, with one also at Walvis Bay from late October. Three Terek Sandpipers Xenus cinereus were at Walvis Bay on 11–12 July; this is generally a scarce species here and decidedly rare in winter. Walvis Bay also held Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus on 11–12 July (ten) and again from late September to December, with up to 31 on 12 November and still up to 15 in mid December (one still in breeding plumage). Also there was a Common Black-headed Gull Larus ridibundus (initially in full breeding plumage) from 23 September until December at least.

In the Caprivi, a Ross’s Turaco Musophaga rossae was seen on Ntwala Island, near Impalila Island, in mid October; if photographs can be obtained, this would constitute the first substantiated record of the species in southern Africa. A Great Spotted Cuckoo Clamator glandarius was observed east of Luderitz in July; not only is this further south than its normal range, but the time of the year is also odd. On 22 November, a Woodland Kingfisher Halcyon senegalensis was located at Monte Christo Guest Farm, c.30 km north of Windhoek; this is more than 400 km south of this species’ regular range in the country.

A Grey Wagtail Motacilla cinerea was reported at Popa Falls in October (apparently the sixth record for Namibia) and on Friedental farm, c.80 km south-west of Windhoek, in early December. Shelley’s Sunbird Cinnyris shelleyi was seen again in the north, at Shamvura Lodge, Kavango, on 23 September. Of regional interest is a pair of Village Indigobirds Vidua chalybeata (of the white-billed race okavangoensis) at Avis Dam, just outside Windhoek, on 20 December; the nearest known resident population is in the Okavango Delta, at least 650 km to the north-east, but it is perhaps not that surprising given the recent colonisation of Red-billed Firefinches Lagonosticta senegala, its primary host, in the Windhoek area.

Records from January - June 2009 include the following. A very weak juvenile Tristan Albatross Diomedea (exulans) dabbenena was found at Cape Cross on 23 January; it died shortly after having been taken into care. Also on 23rd, a freshly dead Light-mantled Albatross Phoebetria palpebrata was found south of Walvis Bay; this is the first record for Namibia. A Glossy Ibis Plegadis falcinellus was at the mouth of the Swakop River on 24 - 25 January. On 15 January, a Western Marsh Harrier Circus aeuginosus was observed at Shamvura. A European Oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus was in the Walvis Bay area on 24 - 25 January, an American Golden Plover Pluvialis dominica at the Swakop River mouth in January - early February and a Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa at Walvis Bay on 15 January. As usual, Mile 4 Salt Works at Swakopmund held up to two long-staying Common Redshanks Tringa totanus from January to at least 31 May. At least three Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus were in the Walvis Bay area on 24 January; by early February there were at least six, and on 12 June one of a group of at least six was in full breeding plumage. Also there were at least eight Red Phalaropes P. fulicarius on 21 February and a Common Black-headed Gull Larus ridibundus in full breeding plumage from 24 January to at least early February. A Franklin’s Gull L. pipixcan was seen at Okerfontein waterhole, c.25 km west of Namutoni, Etosha National Park, on 3 April; although this Nearctic species is an almost annual vagrant to southern Africa’s coast, it is very rare inland. A remarkable record is that of four Bohm’s Spinetails Neafrapus boehmi with a group of Little Swifts Apus affinis in the vicinity of Windhoek International Airport on 22 March; in Namibia, the species is known only from the Caprivi Strip. Two Angola Swallows Hirundo angolensis were seen flying over the Chobe River at King’s Den Rest Camp (on the Namibian side opposite Sududu Island) amongst many other hirundines, on 12 June. In Mudumu National Park, a Shelley’s Sunbird Cinnyris shelleyi was photographed on 10 May.

A Great Knot Calidris tenuirostris was discovered at Walvis Bay on 24 November 2008; this is the fourth record for southern Africa following the recent sighting of three at Inhambane in Mozambique.Two Common Redshanks Tringa totanus reported from Mile 4 Salt Works in Swakopmund on 24 May remained until June, with up to three there in July - August, up to four in September - October and one in November - December; the species is now annual at this site. Up to 13 Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus were at Walvis Bay on 23 September, with up to 14 there in early November. The continued presence of Shelley’s Sunbird Cinnyris shelleyi at Kalizo Lodge near Katimo Mulilo has been confirmed; it has been recorded regularly since 2004 and has now been found breeding - the first confirmed nesting record in the subregion.

Records from December 2007 - February 2008 include the following. A Slaty Egret Egretta vinaceigula was found in Daan Viljoen Game Park on 10 February. In the Caprivi Strip, an adult Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus was seen at the Kwando River on 4 January and a Lesser Black-backed Gull Larus fuscus in Mahango Game Reserve on 15 December and 2 January. Waders at Mile 4 Salt Works, Swakopmund, included an American Golden Plover Pluvialis dominica on 15 - 17 December, with two there on 7 January, a Pectoral Sandpiper Calidris melanotos also on 7th, and a Common Redshank Tringa totanus on 17 December and 7 January. All these species were still present at the end of February. Also there were six Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus from 9 February.

In Walvis Bay, southern Africa’s 15th White-rumped Sandpiper Calidris fuscicollis was observed on 19 January; this was presumably the same individual that was reported at this site at the end of 2007. Also there on the same day was a Common Redshank. Red-necked Phalaropes were seen there on 7 January and remained until the end of February at least, with up to 28 counted. A Red Phalarope P. fulicarius was found on 9 February.

Records from July-November 2007 include the following. A European Honey Buzzard Pernis apivorus was photographed at Daan Viljoen Game Reserve, near Windhoek, on 3 December. An American Golden Plover Pluvialis dominica was reported from Swakopmund on 26 October and photographed on 29 October and 1 November. Common Redshanks Tringa totanus were seen at Swakopmund on 3 September (one) and Walvis Bay on 14 November (two). Also there were a Red (Grey) Phalarope Phalaropus fulicarius with 12 Red-necked Phalaropes P. lobatus, including one in breeding plumage. A Lesser Black-backed Gull Larus fuscus was at the Okandeka Waterhole in Etosha National Park on 6 July; it was last reported on 25 July.

A European Turtle Dove Streptopelia turtur photographed in the Erongo Mountains on 15 November was still present next day; only two previous records have been published: one, undated, from the north of the country (Birds of Africa 1986) and another, from Etosha National Park, on 17 July 2002 (Roberts’ Birds of Southern Africa 2005). On 13 November, several Sclater’s Larks Spizocorys sclateri were found c.130 km south-east of Walvis Bay; this must be at the limit of their range. They were also present in the same area in November 2006. A Collared Flycatcher Ficedula albicollis was first reported from Shamvura Lodge, Kavango Region, on 29 September and photographed on 8 October. Also there, a pair of Souza’s Shrikes Lanius souzae was photographed at its nest containing three small nestlings in November.

The following records are from November 2006 - April 2007. An American Golden Plover Pluvialis dominica was at Swakopmund sewage works on 29 November where it remained until at least 6 December; one was at Mile 4 salt works on 18 January, with a second individual subsequently, and both still present on 25 February. Three Pectoral Sandpipers Calidris melanotos were at Mile 4 salt works in Swakopmund on 20 February, two at the nearby sewage works on 14 March and one at Walvis Bay lagoon on 25 February. Common Redshanks Tringa totanus were reported from Mile 4 salt works on 1 November and 7 January, with at least three more there in January; three were also present on 14 March. Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus were at Walvis Bay on 23 November (no fewer than 24) and Mile 4 salt works on 24 January (three) and 14 March (one). At the latter site, a Common Black-headed Gull Larus ridibundus was observed on 19 February. Africa’s second Elegant Tern Sterna elegans was discovered at a Sandwich Tern S. sandvicensis roost at Mile 4 salt works on 28 January and remained there until at least 14 March; this may well be the same bird that stayed in the Western Cape, South Africa, in January - February 2006.

The following records are from March–October 2006. Namibia’s first (and southern Africa's third) Western Reef Heron Egretta gularis was discovered near Kalizi Lodge in the Caprivi Strip on 16 June; a bird of the eastern race schistacea was reported from South Luangwa National Park in Zambia in February and also from Rondebult Bird Sanctuary, Gauteng, South Africa, in the second half of April; it is possible that all these sightings involved the same individual. An Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus was seen in Etosha National Park on 8 September. Common Redshanks Tringa totanus were reported from the Kunene River mouth on 22 February, at Mile 4 salt works in Swakopmund on 30 March, 10 April and 20 October, and at Walvis Bay on 10 September. A Red-necked Phalarope Phalaropus lobatus were still at Mile 4 salt works, Swakopmund, on 30 March. Eleven Red-necked Phalaropes, found at Walvis Bay on 23 July, were still there on 15 August; one was also there on 1 October. At Swakopmund, a Franklin’s Gull Larus pipixcan was observed on 1 June. Two Lesser Black-backed Gulls L. fuscus and 20 Royal Terns Sterna maxima were at the Kunene River mouth on 22 February.

In mid-October 2005, the following were observed off Namibia's coast: Wandering Albatross Diomedea exulans, Northern Royal Albatross D. (epomophora) sanfordi, Dark-mantled Sooty Albatross Phoebetria fusca, two Spectacled Petrels Procellaria (aequinoctialis) conspicillata and nine Red (Grey) Phalaropes Phalaropus fulicarius.

At Walvis Bay, a Eurasian Oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus, two Black-tailed Godwits Limosa limosa and up to six Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus were seen on 16 December 2005 and last reported on 29 January. A Common Redshank Tringa totanus found at Swakopmund Saltworks on 8 January was still present at the end of February. A Red-necked Phalarope was at Swakopmund Saltworks on 20 January and a Red (Grey) Phalarope Phalaropus fulicarius at Walvis Bay the next day.

In April-December 2005 the following were reported. A Little Penguin Eudyptula minor was photographed ashore on Ichaboe Island in mid-April 2005. This puzzling record is the first of this Australasian species for Africa and raises the question how the bird got here; the bird was captured and examined but showed no signs of prior captivity. Two Wandering Albatrosses Diomedea exulans were spotted c.60 nautical miles west of Walvis Bay on 22 July, with a Grey-headed Albatross D. chrysostoma in the same area next day. A European Honey Buzzard Pernis apivorus was seen at Kalizo Lodge, east of Katima Mulilo, in the extreme north-east, on 6 December. Single Booted Eagles Hieraaetus pennatus were at Walvis Bay Sewage works on 22 October and 1 November.

Eurasian Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus were seen at Walvis Bay on 22 October 2005 and 1 November. Also at Walvis Bay, an American Golden Plover Pluvialis dominica was found on 22 October. Single Common Redshanks Tringa totanus were seen throughout the period at Walvis Bay and / or Swakopmund. A Terek Sandpiper Xenus cinereus was at Walvis Bay on 30 October. Five Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus were at Walvis Bay on 3 June, with four also there on 14 November, and one at Mile 4, Swakopmund, on 4-5 November. Namibia’s first Lesser Crested Tern Sterna bengalensis was found at Mile 4 Salt Works, Swakopmund, on 5 May; it was last reported on 11 November. Also at Swakopmund, 20,000+ Common Terns S. hirundo were counted on 14 November, c.2,000 Black Terns Chlidonias niger on 24 October, with 4,000+ there on 14 November, and one White-winged Tern Ch. leucopterus on 5-6 and 13 November, with 40+ there on 14 November.

A Grey Wagtail Motacilla cinerea was found in Halali Camp, Etosha National Park, on 19 October; it remained there for some time and was photographed on 2 November. Also in Etosha, an Olive-tree Warbler Hippolais olivetorum was discovered near Namutoni on 24 November. Shelley’s Sunbird Cinnyris shelleyi was regularly observed and also photographed at Kalizo Lodge, near Katima Mulilo, in September–December.

In January-April 2005 the following were reported. Two Eurasian Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus were at Walvis Bay on 22 January. Thirteen Black-tailed Godwits Limosa limosa were counted at Lake Liambezi, Caprivi Strip, on 2 January; at Swakopmund, one was present from on 28 February until 14 March at least. A Common Redshank Tringa totanus, found at Swakopmund on 12 January, remained until at least 14 March; another was at Walvis Bay on 22 January. Also at Walvis Bay on 22 January were four Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus, with one at Swakopmund on 28 February remaining until at least 14 March. A Common Black-headed Gull Larus ridibundus was at Swakopmund on 12 January. The second Gull-billed Tern Sterna nilotica for Namibia was at Sikoma Island, Caprivi Strip, on 26 January.

Records from Walvis Bay on 10–11 November 2004 include a Eurasian Oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus, a Pectoral Sandpiper Calidris melanotos, two Black-tailed Godwits Limosa limosa, six Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus and, rarest of all, a Wilson's Phalarope P. tricolor. A pair of Shelley's Sunbirds Cinnyris shelleyi was sighted regularly at Kalizo Lodge on the Zambezi, in the Caprivi Strip in September 2004; this species is very rarely observed in southern Africa.

Records in the period July 2003 to April 2004 include the following. A Streaky-breasted Flufftail Sarothrura boehmi was photographed north of Etosha in January. A Striped Crake Aenigmatolimnas marginalis was found in a flooded vlei at Katima in April. Eurasian Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus were reported from Swakopmund Salt Works on 3 July and from Walvis Bay in March and April; an adult has been at the latter site for the last four years at least. Walvis Bay also held a Pectoral Sandpiper Calidris melanotos on 15 March and two Black-tailed Godwits Limosa limosa on 23 March. There were also two breeding plumaged adult females and an adult male Red-necked Phalarope Phalaropus lobatus on 3 July; this species is regular at this site in the Austral summer (with up to 28 in 2003 and 2004) but unusual in July. Still at Walvis Bay, a Gull-billed Tern Sterna nilotica, which stayed from 23 March until 2 May, appears to be the first for Namibia. An Olive-tree Warbler Hippolais olivetorum, observed at length at the entrance to Mahango Game Reserve on 10 November, represents one of very few records in Namibia. At the same location, Northern Grey-headed Sparrows Passer griseus were recorded on 12 July and 10 November; this seems to be a westward range expansion for this species.

In February 2003, a Sooty Falcon Falco concolor was seen hunting for insects at dusk at Halali, Etosha National Park, on 13th. A Pacific Golden Plover Pluvialis fulva was observed at Swakopmund, at the mouth of the river, on 22nd. Also in 2003, on the Okavango River on the border of Namibia and Botswana, three large breeding colonies of African Skimmers Rynchops flavirostris were located in Mahango National Park and c50 chicks were ringed to mid October.

Records from November 2001 to March 2002 include the following. Southern Africa's third Little Blue Heron Egretta caerulea was found at Walvis Bay on 14 March. An Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus was reported from Etosha National Park on 4 November. Single Eurasian Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus and Black-tailed Godwits Limosa limosa were regularly seen at Walvis Bay throughout the period. Two Eurasian Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus were also found at Sandwich harbour, together with a Lesser Sand Plover Charadrius mongolus, on 22 January. Reports from the same site included two Broad-billed Sandpipers Limicola falcinellus on 14 April and a Hudsonian Godwit Limosa haemastica on 29 December, 6 to 9 February and 9 April. A Spotted Redshank Tringa erythropus was observed at Rendu Sewage Works, in the north, on 31 January. Common Redshanks T. totanus were seen at Walvis Bay on 29 November (one), 12 January (four), 22 February (one) and 6 March (one), and at Swakopmund from 3 December to 3 January (two) and 2 March (two). Throughout the period, Red-necked Phalaropes Phalaropus lobatus were regularly found at Walvis Bay (highest number: five on 12 January) and Swakopmund (with up to four in December and three in March). Four Red Phalaropes P. fulicarius were at Walvis Bay Saltworks on 12 January and a flock of 81 was seen offshore on 11 March. A Franklin's Gull Larus pipixcan was discovered at the Swakop River mouth on 29 November and another at Walvis Bay on 7/8 February.

Map

Wed, 01/23/2013 - 17:35 -- abc_admin

Note the map scale is approximate only.

References

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BirdLife International (2000) Threatened Birds of the World. Barcelona and Cambridge, UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International.

COHEN, C., SPOTTISWOODE, C. & ROSSOUW, J. (2006) Southern African Birdfinder: where to find 1,400 birds in southern Africa and Madagascar. Struik Publishers. 

de BOER, M.N. (2015) First record of Barau’s Petrel Pterodroma baraui for Namibia, South Atlantic. ABC Bulletin 22(2) pp 211 - 213.

DONALD, P.F. (2013) First record of Ortolan Bunting Emberiza hortulana for southern Africa, in Namibia. ABC Bulletin 21(2) pp 228-229.

DOWSETT, R.J., BREWSTER, C.A. and HINES, C. (2011) Some bird distributional limits in the Upper Zambezi Valley. ABC Bulletin 18(1) pp 17-30.

ENGEL, J. (2009) First record of Great Knot Calidris tenuirostris for Namibia. ABC Bulletin 16(2) p 220.

GIBBON, G. Roberts' Multimedia Birds of Southern Africa Version 3.0. This is a comprehensive and interactive multimedia program with 950 Southern African bird species, 4,000 photos, 850 bird sounds and 650 bird videos on 2 CD-ROMs.

GINN, P. et al (1997) The Complete Book of Southern African Birds published by Struik. "Although this is a large book many birdwatchers have found it incredibly useful in the field because of the outstanding selection of photographs of most species." Also the interesting notes on many species have proved very useful in the field.

HINES, C. (1996) Namibia's Caprivi Strip. ABC Bulletin 3(2) pp 113-128.

KOPIJ, G. (2014) Unusual concentration of Red-billed Buffalo Weaver Bubalornis niger nests on pylons in northern Namibia. ABC Bulletin 21(1) pp 82-83. 

SIMMONS, R.E., BOIX-HINZEN, C., BARNES, K., JARVIS, A.M., and ROBERTSON, A. chapter on Namibia pages 639 ­ 660 in FISHPOOL, L.D.C. and EVANS M.I. editors (2001) Important Bird Areas in Africa and Associated Islands: Priority sites for conservation. Newbury and Cambridge, UK. Pisces Publications and BirdLife International (BirdLife Conservation Series No.11).

SINCLAIR, I. and HOCKEY, P. (1996) The SASOL Larger Illustrated Guide to Birds of Southern Africa. Illustrated by Peter Hayman and Norman Arlott. First published by Struik in 1996. ISBN 1-8682 5759-2 for the English version and ISBN 1-8682-5845-9 for Afrikaans.

SINCLAIR, I & RYAN, P, (2003) Birds of Africa South of the Sahara. Struik Publishers, ISBN 1-8687-2857-9.

WOOLLEY, S. (2013) First Lesser Yellowlegs Tringa flavipes for Namibia. ABC Bulletin 20(1) pp 75-76.

Conservation

Wed, 01/23/2013 - 17:32 -- abc_admin
Desert_African_Elephants_Namibia

Namibia near Uis. Desert Elephants digging for water in a dry river bed at dusk

Image Credit: 
John Caddick

Namibia was the first country in the world to incorporate the protection of the environment into its constitution; some 14% of the land is protected, including virtually the entire Namib Desert coastal strip.

Its state-controlled protected area network comprises 21 parks and recreation areas. Three protected areas, Etosha Pan, Namib-Naukluft and Skeleton Coast comprise 80% of it.

In addition, Namibia has 150 private nature reserves totalling 7,642 km2 or almost 1% of the land area.

In common with most African countries, Namibia has a number of environmental issues including very limited natural fresh water resources; desertification; wildlife poaching; and land degradation.

Namibia is party to a number of international agreements: Antarctic-Marine Living Resources, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol, Desertification, Endangered Species, Hazardous Wastes, Law of the Sea, Ozone Layer Protection, and Wetlands.

The African Bird Club made an expedition award in 2004 from its conservation fund for a project to determine the population densities and distribution of Cape Griffon Gyps coprotheres and White-backed Vulture Gyps africanus around the Waterburg Plateau Park.

Books & Sounds

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With birding such a big pastime in southern Africa, there is a well established birding literature available. Not only are there great field and sound guides but also many second-level publications dealing with birds from particular species groups.

The major field guides for most of the southern Africa region are the SASOL and Newman's guides and various photographic guides with some specific ones for different countries. The SASOL guide is excellent - its illustrations are fantastic and the text succinct yet authoritative.

The Southern African Birdfinder: Where to find 1,400 bird species in southern Africa must rank as one of the best 'Where to' guides for a region. It contains detailed information on sites, clear maps and directions and great photos. With a very slick layout this book is an essential addition to any trip in southern Africa. Highly recommended.

 

Book image: 
Book info: 
Sasol Birds of Southern Africa (4th edition), Ian Sinclair, Phil Hockey, Warwick Tarboton & Peter Ryan, Struik, Softback.
Book description: 

4th edition. The best field guide to the region with over 200 colour plates and numerous distribution maps. The Southern African region is Botwana, Lesotho, southern Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland and Zimbabwe.

This fourth edition has been greatly improved by the addition of group introductions, calendar bars showing species' occurrence and breeding periods, a section on 'how to use this book', as well as sonograms depicting the calls of tricky bird groups. The newly designed plates are meticulously illustrated, with labels pinpointing key differentiating features. Distribution maps show the relative abundance of a species in the region and also indicate resident or migrant status.

Written by top birders, this authoritative and comprehensive identification guide is invaluable to all birders. 464 pages.

Book image: 
Book info: 
Newman's Birds of Southern Africa, Ken Newman, New Holland, Softback.
Book description: 

Commemorative Edition.

Sadly, Ken Newman passed away in 2006. This commemorative edition of his book has been revised by Vanessa Newman, Ken's daugter and incorporates the latest taxonomic changes. 510 pages.

Book image: 
Book info: 
Roberts Bird Guide, Hugh Chittenden, John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Softback.
Book description: 

At last! a field guide version of Roberts Birds of Southern Africa VIIth Edition featuring large, clear illustrations, distribution maps as well as a "breeding bar" indicating breeding season. Covers over 950 species including all the recent splits. 456 pages.

Book image: 
Book info: 
Birds of Africa South of the Sahara, Ian Sinclair & Peter Ryan, New Holland, Softback.
Book description: 

Second edition, including 500 new images and 400 updated distribution maps. Unrivalled coverage of African birds in a single volume. 2129+ species covered with an additional 101 vagrants briefly described. Revised to reflect the latest changes in taxonomy. Species descriptions give precise identification features highlighting differences between similar species as well as briefly reporting habitat, status and call. Annotated illustrations portray distinctive plumages as well as diagnostic flight patterns and major geographic variants where applicable.

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Book info: 
A Photographic Guide to Birds of Southern Africa, Ian Sinclair, New Holland, Softback.
Book description: 

Covers 500 species in a user-friendly format and includes distribution maps and an 'occurrence bar'. 144 pages.

Book image: 
Book info: 
Complete Photo Field Guide Birds of Southern Africa, Ian Sinclair & Peter Ryan, Struik, Softback.
Book description: 

Comprising the most comprehensive collection of photos of southern African birds in one volume, this field guide describes and illustrates all 958 bird species found in the region plus an additional 17 species from Antarctica, the Southern Ocean & associated islands. 432 pages.

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Book info: 
Photographic Guide to Birds of Namibia, Ian & Jackie Sinclair, New Holland, Softback.
Book description: 

Slim pocket guide. Colour photos of 257 species. 144 pages.

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Book info: 
Sasol Birding Map of Southern Africa, Ian Sinclair and Trevor Hardaker, Struik, Map.
Book description: 

2002. Includes over 200 birding sites in Southern Africa, as well as many game and nature reserves, towns, and routes. Each site description gives details of habitat type and the birds it attracts. Includes in-depth profiles on 8 of the region's major sites.

Book image: 
Book info: 
Southern African Birdfinder: Where to find 1400 bird species in southern Africa, C Cohen & C Spottiswoode, assisted by J Rossouw, New Holland, Softback.
Book description: 

2006. The ideal companion to all the local bird field guides. After an introduction to birding in the southern African region, the authors identify and describe more than 330 birding sites and associated birds across South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Madagascar and, the little-documented but increasingly popular, areas of Angola, Mozambique, Zambia and Malawi. All sites are ranked into one of three categories of priority: essential (the regions best); excellent (top sites but expendable to a time-limited visitor) and local interest (ideal for those looking for new areas to explore). All sites include practical details of access, best times to visit, habitat diversity and general natural history.

Includes a fold-out map of the entire region that features all routes. A quick guide to finding the region's top 100 birds and an annotated checklist conclude the book.

"Written by three of the most experienced birders in the region, they have poured their experience into its production and this really shows in the level of detail and coverage." - Martin Fowlie, BTO

Visiting

Wed, 01/23/2013 - 17:24 -- abc_admin

Birding tours

Birding AfricaBirding Ecotours, Birdquest, Field Guides, Lawson's, Letaka Safaris, LimosaRockjumper, Safari Consultants and Safariwise organise tours to Namibia.

Logistics

General: an organised tour is a good way to see a large number of the endemic and near endemic species in Namibia. Many people however make their own travel arrangements and this is perfectly feasible.

Flights: a selection of major airlines fly into Windhoek, but it is sometimes cheaper to fly to South Africa and then either drive or fly onto Namibia. South African Airways and Air Namibia operate daily flights between Johannesburg, Cape Town and Hosea Kutako International Airport, 42 km east of Windhoek. Air Namibia also flies twice weekly between Windhoek and Harare, Victoria Falls, Luanda, Lusaka, Maun and Gaborone. There are regular direct flights from London and Frankfurt to Windhoek. Air Namibia also operate internal flights between Windhoek and the major towns in Namibia.

Visas: you should check with your local embassy and / or its website for visa requirements. In 2005, visas were not required for visitors from the UK and South Africa.

Vaccinations: your local doctor should be consulted about health matters and the range of inoculations which is advised.

Travel: this is best done within Namibia in a private vehicle as public transport is limited and the distances are vast making travel rather slow. The road infrastructure is good throughout the country and most destinations are well marked on maps. Bus services are limited to a few luxury coaches that connect Windhoek to Cape Town and Johannesburg, but local minibuses run up and down the B1 from Oshakati to Keetmanshoop.

There are border crossings from Botswana, Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa and bus companies service these routes. Driving between South Africa and Namibia is quite comfortable on well-made roads.

Cars can be hired in Windhoek and at the airport. You should consider what type of vehicle you will require as travel to birding hotspots and around reserves may be on gravel roads where a 4WD and / or vehicle with a high ground clearance can be useful. For travel in desert areas, make sure that you have plenty of water, spare fuel and provisions.

The Trans-Namib Railway operates a reasonable service that connects most major towns. The trains are reliable and carry economy and sleeper classes, and if you're not in a rush they represent a pleasant and inexpensive - if extremely slow - way to see the country.

Currency: the local unit of currency is the Namibian Dollar the value of which is pegged to the South African Rand. South African notes and coins are accepted in Namibia and often received in change. There are several banks with ATMs in the centre of Windhoek. Travellers cheques, foreign currency and major credit cards are also widely accepted.

Safety

Guidebooks, travel companies and websites provide much of the advice one needs, but key points warrant repetition here: (1) be aware of the risk of malaria and seek current advice, sleep in a sealed tent or under a net and take prophylaxis as recommended; (2) always ensure you have sufficient water and some method of purification (even if this comprises a pot and a campfire for boiling); (3) do not underestimate the danger of being in the sun for too long, ensure you use sun-block, drink plenty of water and wear a hat; (4) be aware of the risk of AIDS; (5) ensure that you take a reasonably-equipped first-aid pack with you including supplies of hypodermic and suturing needles. See the following 2 websites for the latest safety and travel information: US Travel and UK FCO.

Hotspots

Wed, 01/23/2013 - 17:21 -- abc_admin
Namibia_birding_map

Note that the map scale is only approximate.

Lilac_breasted_Roller_Namibia

Namibia Daan Viljoen Game Park. Lilac-breasted Roller Coracias caudatus in flight at dusk

Image Credit: 
John Caddick
Flamingos_Namibia

Namibia Walvis Bay. Greater and Lesser Flamingo Phoenicopterus ruber and Phoeniconaias minor

Image Credit: 
John Caddick

The following extracts are taken from " Southern African Birdfinder: where to find 1,400 birds in southern Africa and Madagascar" by Callan Cohen, Claire Spottiswoode and Jonathan Rossouw, released by Struik Publishers in 2006. 

Sossusvlei The picturesque red sands of the Namib dune sea at Sossusvlei are one of Namibia's premier tourist attractions, though surrounding gravel plains and rocky escarpments of the Namib-Naukluft Park are of equal interest to the birder. Specials: Ostrich Struthio camelus, Ludwig's Bustard Neotis ludwigii, Rüppell's Bustard Eupodotis rueppellii, Burchell's Courser Cursorius rufus, Dune Lark Certhilauda erythrochlamys.

Daan Viljoen Game Park Situated in the rugged Khomas Hochland overlooking Windhoek, this park makes a convenient base for further exploration of the Windhoek area and provides an excellent introduction to the birds of the dry west. In addition to its Namibian Escarpment endemics, such as Monteiro's Hornbill Tockus monteiri and Damara Rockjumper (Rockrunner) Chaetops pycnopygius, the rocky slopes also hold the elusive Orange River Francolin Francolinus levaillantoides, rarely recorded on birding trips elsewhere in Southern Africa. Specials: Orange River Francolin Francolinus levaillantoides, Maccoa Duck Oxyura maccoa, Monteiro's Hornbill Tockus monteiri, Short-toed Rock-Thrush Monticola brevipes, Carp's Tit Parus carpi, Barred Wren-Warbler Calamonastes fasciolatus, Damara Rockjumper (Rockrunner) Chaetops pycnopygius, Long-billed Pipit Anthus similis and Black-cheeked Waxbill Estrilda charmosyna.

Erongo The magnificent, granite domes of the Erongo Mountains lie 60 km to the east of the Spitzkoppe and offer quality endemics in one of Namibia's most atmospheric settings. Specials: Hartlaub's Francolin Francolinus hartlaubi, Monteiro's Hornbill Tockus monteiri, Damara Hornbill Tockus (erythrorhynchus) damarensis, Rüppell's Parrot Poicephalus rueppellii, Southern White-faced Owl Ptilopsis granti, Freckled Nightjar Caprimulgus tristigma, White-tailed Shrike Lanioturdus torquatus, Short-toed Rock-Thrush Monticola brevipes and Damara Rockjumper (Rockrunner) Chaetops pycnopygius.

Spitzkoppe Famous amongst birders as an accessible and reliable spot for the localised Herero Chat Namibornis herero, the Spitzkoppe also offer a superb supporting cast of Dry West specials and some of Namibia's most spectacular scenery. Specials: Herero Chat Namibornis herero, Monteiro's Hornbill Tockus monteiri, Rosy-faced Lovebird Agapornis roseicollis, Bradfield's Swift Apus bradfieldi, Rüppell's Bustard Eupodotis rueppellii, Augur Buzzard Buteo augur, Booted Eagle Hieraaetus pennatus, White-tailed Shrike Lanioturdus torquatus and Dusky Sunbird Cinnyris fuscus.

Walvis Bay With its extensive mudflats, artificial salt pans and marine coastline, the Walvis Bay area is a Mecca for shorebird enthusiasts, and is also a convenient site to search for marine cormorants, Damara Tern Sterna balaenarum and the Namibian endemic Dune Lark Certhilauda erythrochlamys. Specials: Chestnut-banded Plover Charadrius pallidus, Damara Sterna balaenarum and Black Terns Chlidonias niger, vast numbers of Greater Phoenicopterus ruber and Lesser Flamingos Phoeniconaias minor, Dune Certhilauda erythrochlamys and Gray's Larks Ammomanes grayi, and regular sightings of migrant waders rare in Southern Africa: Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa, Common Redshank Tringa totanus, Broad-billed Sandpiper Limicola falcinellus, Red-necked Phalarope Phalaropus lobatus and Eurasian Oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus.

Etosha Namibia's most famous game reserve, and the subject of many a wildlife documentary, is also a superb birding destination. The arid woodlands and grassy plains surrounding the vast Etosha Pan are home to a wide variety of northern Namibian specials. Specials: Ostrich Struthio camelus, Violet Wood-hoopoe Phoeniculus damarensis, Rüppell's Bustard Eupodotis rueppellii, Kori Bustard Ardeotis kori, Blue Crane Anthropoides paradiseus, Caspian Plover (rare) Charadrius asiaticus, Pygmy Polihierax semitorquatus and Red-necked Falcons Falco chicquera, Black-faced Turdoides melanops, Southern Pied T. bicolor and Bare-cheeked Babblers T. gymnogenys, and Pink-billed Lark Spizocorys conirostris.

Ruacana Wild, remote and exotic, Ruacana's legendary status amongst birders is well deserved. One of the only sites on Earth for the localised and evocatively named Cinderella Waxbill Estrilda thomensis, and one of the few sites for Rufous-tailed Palm-Thrush Cichladusa ruficauda, the area was entirely closed to visitors during the long war with Angola. With the advent of peace, birders can again experience the avian treasures of this unique wilderness area. Specials: Cinderella Waxbill Estrilda thomensis, Rufous-tailed Palm-Thrush Cichladusa ruficauda, Hartlaub's Francolin Francolinus hartlaubi, Monteiro's Hornbill Tockus monteiri, Madagascar Bee-eater Merops superciliosus, Rüppell's Parrot Poicephalus rueppellii, Grey Kestrel Falco ardosiaceus, White-tailed Shrike Lanioturdus torquatus, Bare-cheeked Babbler Turdoides gymnogenys, Benguela Long-billed Lark Certhilauda benguelensis and Chestnut Weaver Ploceus rubiginosus.

Hobatere This 35,000 ha reserve immediately to the west of Etosha National Park straddles the endemic-rich Namibian Escarpment and is one of the premier sites for such localised birds as Rüppell's Parrot Poicephalus rueppellii, Bare-cheeked Babbler Turdoides gymnogenys and Violet Wood-hoopoe Phoeniculus damarensis. Specials: Monteiro's Hornbill Tockus monteiri, Violet Wood-hoopoe Phoeniculus damarensis, Rüppell's Parrot Poicephalus rueppellii, White-tailed Shrike Lanioturdus torquatus, Short-toed Rock-Thrush Monticola brevipes, Carp's Tit Parus carpi, Damara Rockjumper (Rockrunner) Chaetops pycnopygius and Bare-cheeked Babbler Turdoides gymnogenys.

Rundu The woodlands and wetlands around Rundu, a small town on the Kavango River, are home to a number of northern specials, and are well worth birding en route to the Caprivi Strip. Specials: African Pygmy-Goose Nettapus auritus, Bradfield's Hornbill Tockus bradfieldi, Coppery-tailed Coucal Centropus cupreicaudus, Allen's Gallinule Porphyrio alleni, Lesser Moorhen Gallinula angulata, Lesser Jacana Microparra capensis, Dickinson's Kestrel Falco dickinsoni, African Hobby F. cuvierii, Rufous-bellied Heron Ardeola rufiventris, Dwarf Bittern Ixobrychus sturmii, Swamp Boubou Laniarius bicolor, Arnott's Chat Myrmecocichla arnotti, Sharp-tailed Starling Lamprotornis acuticaudus, Rufous-bellied Tit Parus rufiventris, Levaillant's Cisticola Cisticola tinniens, Green-capped Eremomela Eremomela scotops, Hartlaub's Babbler Turdoides hartlaubii, Woodland Pipit Anthus nyassae and Brown Firefinch Lagonosticta nitidula.

Mahango This magnificent game reserve, lying along the Kavango River floodplain in the western Caprivi Strip, is one of Southern Africa's top birding spots. Although it covers only 25,000 ha it boasts a birdlist of over 400 species, including an impressive selection of Okavango specials. The fact that one is allowed to explore the reserve on foot, despite the presence of Lion, Elephant and Buffalo, only adds to the excitement of birding in this wild corner of Namibia. Soon, the reserve is expected to become part of the new Bwabata Reserve. Specials: Bradfield's Hornbill Tockus bradfieldi, Coppery-tailed Coucal Centropus cupreicaudus, Wattled Crane Bugeranus carunculatus, Burchell's Sandgrouse Pterocles burchelli, Greater Painted-snipe Rostratula benghalensis, Long-toed Lapwing Vanellus crasssirostris, African Skimmer Rynchops flavirostris, Western Banded Snake Eagle Circaetus cinerascens, Dickinson's Kestrel Falco dickinsoni, African Hobby Falco cuvierii, Slaty Egret Egretta vinaceigula, Dwarf Bittern Ixobrychus sturmii, Swamp Boubou Laniarius bicolor, Rufous-bellied Tit Parus rufiventris, Levaillant's Cisticola tinniens and Chirping Cisticolas C. pipiens, Greater Swamp Warbler Acrocephalus rufescens, Green-capped Eremomela Eremomela scotops, Hartlaub's Babbler Turdoides hartlaubii, Rosy-throated Longclaw Macronyx ameliae, Woodland Pipit Anthus nyassae, Holub's Golden Weaver Ploceus xanthops and Southern Brown-throated Weaver P. xanthopterus, Parasitic Weaver Anomalospiza imberbis and Brown Firefinch Lagonosticta nitidula.

See also the African Bird Club feature article Namibia Caprivi Strip by Christopher Hines, or read it in the Bulletin of the African Bird Club, volume 3.2, September 1996.

Species

Wed, 01/23/2013 - 17:18 -- abc_admin
Ruppells_Korhaan_Namibia

Namibia near Uis. Rüppell's Bustard Eupodotis rueppellii

Image Credit: 
John Caddick
Monteiros_Hornbill_Namibia

Namibia Daan Viljoen Game Park near Windhoek. Monteiro's Hornbill Tockus monteiri

Image Credit: 
John Caddick

Country checklist and status

iGoTerra

We are delighted that our Corporate Sponsor iGoTerra has made its country checklists, including subspecies (IOC or Clements) as well as all other species groups like mammals, butterflies etc. available through the ABC website. The only thing required is a Basic membership / registration which is free of charge. Go to Namibia checklists. If you are already a member of iGoTerra, you will be taken directly to the country page. In case you are not a member, you will be redirected automatically to the registration form and from there can go straight to the country page.​​​​​​​

ABC and other checklists

You can download and print an ABC / Dowsett checklist for Namibia. The ABC lists follow the taxonomic sequence and names of Birds of Africa Volumes I-VII and are kept up to date with published and peer-reviewed records.

Approximately 630 bird species have been recorded in Namibia, with 7 of the 10 families endemic to African continent being represented and only one endemic species, Dune Lark Certhilauda erythrochlamys being restricted to the region.

Endemic species

Dune Lark Certhilauda erythrochlamys

Near endemic species (found in 3 countries at most)

Bank Cormorant Phalacrocorax neglectus
Crowned Cormorant Phalacrocorax coronatus
Black Harrier Circus maurus
Hartlaub's Francolin Francolinus hartlaubi
Karoo Bustard Eupodotis vigorsii
Rüppell's Bustard Eupodotis rueppellii
African Black Oystercatcher Haematopus moquini
Hartlaub's Gull Larus hartlaubii
Rüppell's Parrot Poicephalus rueppellii
Rosy-faced Lovebird Agapornis roseicollis
Bradfield's Swift Apus bradfieldi
White-backed Mousebird Colius colius
Monteiro's Hornbill Tockus monteiri
Karoo Long-billed Lark Certhilauda subcoronata
Benguela Long-billed Lark Certhilauda benguelensis
Sclater's Lark Spizocorys sclateri
Gray's Lark Ammomanes grayi
Black-eared Sparrow Lark Eremopterix australis
Karoo Scrub-Robin Cercotrichas coryphaeus
Herero Chat Namibornis herero
Karoo Chat Cercomela schlegelii
Tractrac Chat Cercomela tractrac
Layard's Tit-Babbler Parisoma layardi
Karoo Eremomela Eremomela gregalis
Namaqua Warbler Phragmacia substriata
Karoo Prinia Prinia maculosa
Rufous-eared Warbler Malcorus pectoralis
Cinnamon-breasted Warbler Euryptila subcinnamomea
White-tailed Shrike Lanioturdus torquatus
Black-faced Babbler Turdoides melanops
Bare-cheeked Babbler Turdoides gymnogenys
Damara Rockjumper (Rockrunner) Chaetops pycnopygius
Southern Grey Tit Parus afer
Pale-winged Starling Onychognathus nabouroup
African Pied Starling Spreo bicolor
Sociable Weaver Philetairus socius
Cinderella Waxbill Estrilda thomensis
White-throated Canary Serinus albogularis
Black-headed Canary Alario alario
Damara Canary Alario leucolaemus

Threatened species

African Penguin Spheniscus demersus Vulnerable
Cape Gannet Sula capensis Vulnerable
Bank Cormorant Phalacrocorax neglectus Vulnerable
Slaty Egret Egretta vinaceigula Vulnerable
Cape Vulture Gyps coprotheres Vulnerable
Lappet-faced Vulture Torgos tracheliotus Vulnerable
Black Harrier Circus maurus Vulnerable
Lesser Kestrel Falco naumanni Vulnerable
Wattled Crane Bugeranus carunculatus Vulnerable
Blue Crane Anthropoides paradiseus Vulnerable

The lists of endemic, near endemic and threatened species have been compiled from a number of sources including the African Bird Club, BirdLife International, and Birds of the World Version 2.0 ® 1994-1996, Dr. Charles Sibley and Thayer Birding Software, Ltd.

Important Bird Areas

Wed, 01/23/2013 - 17:15 -- abc_admin
Namibia_Kunene_River_Ruacana

Namibia Kunene River Ruacana

Image Credit: 
Claire Spottiswoode

There are 19 Important Bird Areas (IBAs) designated by BirdLife International in Namibia which total 108,400 km2 equivalent to about 13% of the land area. 17 of the sites are important for species of global conservation concern. The IBAs are as follows:

Site name Administrative region
Epupa-Ruacana Kunene
Eastern Caprivi wetlands Caprivi
Mahango Game Reserve and Kavango river Caprivi
Etosha National Park Kunene
Hobatere Kunene
Bushmanland (Tsumkwe) Pan system Otjozondjupa
Waterberg Plateau Park Otjozondjupa
Brandberg mountain Erongo
Cape Cross lagoon Erongo
Namib-Naukluft Park Hardap
Mile 4 saltworks Erongo
30-Kilometre Beach: Walvis­Swakopmund Erongo
Walvis Bay Erongo
Sandwich Harbour Erongo
Mercury Island Karas
Ichaboe Island Karas
Lüderitz Bay islands Karas
Possession Island Karas
Sperrgebiet Karas

Despite the high incidence of localised and near-endemic species, Namibia holds only a small portion of a single primary Endemic Bird Area, the Western Angola EBA although there are also two secondary EBAs, Namibian escarpment and Namib desert.

Three main biomes occur in Namibia; Zambezian which includes the woodlands along the Angola border; Kalahari-Highveld with arid savanna and Kalahari vegetation types; and the Namib-Karoo biome.

Namibia also has a varied coastline with a string of rocky islands and the following species have the majority of their global populations breeding on the nearshore islands of the cold waters of the Benguela current, much of which is located off Namibia: African Penguin Spheniscus demersus; Cape Gannet Sula capensis; Cape Cormorant Phalacrocorax capensis; Bank Cormorant P. neglectus; Crowned Cormorant P. coronatus; Hartlaub's Gull Larus hartlaubii; and African Black Oystercatcher Haematopus moquini.

For further details, download the country IBAs from BirdLife International.

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