Working for birds in Africa

Introduction

Wed, 01/23/2013 - 13:57 -- abc_admin
White_Storks_Morocco

European White Storks Ciconia ciconia, Ouarzazate, Morocco. Commonly seen in major cities in Morocco.

Image Credit: 
John Caddick

With friendly people, great scenery, a good tourist infrastructure and excellent birding, Morocco is one of the favourite destinations for birders in North Africa and perhaps the best location to search for a number of rare and endangered species.

Morocco has the only wild population of the critically endangered Northern Bald Ibis Geronticus eremita and is a good place to find species restricted to a few North African countries such as Levaillant’s Woodpecker Picus vaillantii, Moussier’s Redstart Phoenicurus moussieri and Tristram’s Warbler Sylvia deserticola. Until recently, small numbers of the critically endangered Slender-billed Curlew Numenius tenuirostris wintered there.

In addition, with a variety of habitats which include wetlands, mountains and deserts within reach of major tourist centres such as Agadir and Marrakech, Morocco offers good possibilities to see a range of raptors, waterbirds, larks, wheatears and warblers etc. which are difficult to find elsewhere.

From an ornithological viewpoint, we have considered Morocco to include the geographic area of Western Sahara. Although there are proposals to hold a referendum at some future time on independence for Western Sahara, Morocco claims and administers it at present.

The purpose of this document is to provide a summary of Morocco and its birds for birders interested in the country and potentially planning a visit. The information has been put together from a number of sources and it is intended to add new information as it becomes available. As such, readers are welcome to submit contributions by e-mail to info@africanbirdclub.org. You should note that the names of birds used in this document are those of the African Bird Club checklist.

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